As Chancellor Blumenthal and Campus Provost Kliger described in their message to the UCSC community, after several days, the occupation of Kerr Hall ended on Sunday morning. About 70 individuals voluntarily left the building, following directions from UC police. The damage was extensive and some pieces of equipment are broken beyond repair. The cleaning and restoration work to the building will require significant resources from already stretched budgets.

While there were no arrests at Kerr Hall, students who participated in the unlawful demonstration may be subject to student judicial and/or criminal sanctions. We value First Amendment rights; however, the occupation of Kerr Hall violated University policies.

We are disappointed that the actions of a relative few have impacted the thousands of other students as well as faculty and staff and disrupted the work of the University the protesters are seeking to protect. Not only are there financial costs, but the people who really lose are students who are engaged in programming and other events that have been canceled, delayed, or rescheduled due to this disruptive activity. Blocking access to roads means students cannot get to class, occupying buildings takes away focus on other student programming, and interrupting lectures impedes learning for students who want to actively participate in their education.

I understand your frustration about the budget crisis, fee hikes, and reduced services on campus. I also recognize that many of you are equally frustrated with the methods that protesters are using to express their discontent. We remain committed to working with students on managing our resources and including the student voice in budget planning and decision-making. It is important for all members of the UCSC community to continue to freely engage in instruction, research, and co-curricular activities.

Thank you for your patience and continued resolve to make UCSC a premier living-learning community. Best wishes for a restful Thanksgiving holiday.